Course Information

Experimental Studio 2 and 3

George Maciunas, Dick Higgins and other Fluxus artists, 1962.

*2020/2021 Virtual Course Description:

Experimental Studio 2 and 3 are a deeper dive into interpreting and creating live and experimental artworks. During the pandemic, we will engage in weekly exercises, demos, readings and videos to learn some of the historic, theoretical, and technical aspects of working in experimental media forms. The virtual course will emphasize ideas, research, regular exercises and practices, as opposed to more developed and resolved artworks.

Students will perform and create studio exercises at home and in the world – within strict adherence to public health guidelines at all times – using materials and situations at hand. Together we will practice being resourceful and creative within the limits of any given situation. We will explore how to be an artist now – using aspects of performance, snapshot photography, video, audio, and artist multiples – in this unique and challenging historical moment.

Equipment and materials needed:

Students were not charged a course fee for this course during the pandemic. You should have a hard-drive to store large files, and a cell-phone camera or digital camera. Students also need a computer for participation in live meetings, and for editing video and audio files. Headphones are also strongly recommended.

You should expect to purchase materials for your projects, and for any in-class activities. Students will be notified in advance – and costs of nominal materials should probably not exceed a total of $60.

Every Tuesday at 2:30 – 12:30 CLASS HUDDLE

During CLASS HUDDLE – we will get to know one another, and discuss readings, required viewings, assignments and exercises. We will sometimes experiment with exercises live, together on zoom – and make/enact things to discuss during this time. See COURSE LINK for private CLASS HUDDLE Zoom link. It will be the same every week.

Every Thursday from 1:30 – 3:00pm LIVE OFFICE HOURS WITH YOUR PROFESSOR

Talk to Diane about your work in progress, readings, exercises, one-on-one comments on your work and grades. Send me an email in the morning to book a 15-20 minute appointment during this time. See COURSE LINK for private OFFICE HOURS ZOOM Link. It will be the same every week.

Every Tuesday and Thursday from 1 – 4pm LIVE TECHNICIAN HOURS WITH NATHAN

Show up to a zoom meeting with Nathan anytime during these hours to ask your questions, and get tech support for using software and finishing your projects. See COURSE LINK for private LIVE TECH HOURS ZOOM Link. It will be the same every week.

From Haircuts by Children, Mammalian Diving Reflex

EVALUATION:

20% Notes for weeks 1-5 Notes will be evaluated for completion, evidence of curiosity and full engagement with material, level of understanding of critical ideas at play.

20% Exercises for weeks 1-5 Exercises will be evaluated for completion, evidence of historical precedents for the work, understanding of conceptual ideas at play, evidence of technical investment and effort, evidence of experimentation and adventurousness.

10% Participation in Class Huddles for weeks 1 – 5 Attendance, respectful ettiquette, and engagement.

20% Notes for weeks 6-11 Notes will be evaluated for completion, evidence of curiosity and full engagement with material, level of understanding of critical ideas at play.

20% Exercises for weeks 6-11 Exercises will be evaluated for completion, evidence of historical precedents for the work, understanding of conceptual ideas at play, evidence of technical investment and effort, evidence of experimentation and adventurousness.

10% Participation in Class Huddles for weeks 6 – 12 Attendance, respectful ettiquette, and engagement

Still from I Promise I Will Always be This Way, Jon Sasaki, 2008.

Netiquette Statement:

Be kind and respectful to your fellow classmates and your instructors.

Please do not record, reproduce, or distribute course materials without permission.

The Netiquette statement provides student behaviour standards for courses that are being delivered online.

Online Behaviour

Inappropriate online behaviour will not be tolerated – and can result in penalties for academic misconduct , and have legal implications actionable by the University and your instructors.

Examples of inappropriate online behaviour include:

·         Posting inflammatory messages about your instructor or fellow students

·         Using obscene or offensive language online

·         Copying or presenting someone else’s work as your own

·         Adapting information from the Internet without using proper citations or references

·         Buying or selling term papers or assignments

·         Posting or selling course materials to course notes websites

·         Having someone else complete your quiz or completing a quiz for/with another student

·         Stating false claims about lost quiz answers or other assignment submissions

·         Threatening or harassing a student or instructor online

·         Discriminating against fellow students, instructors and/or TAs

·         Using the course website to promote profit-driven products or services

·         Attempting to compromise the security or functionality of the learning management system

·         Sharing your user name and password

·         Recording lectures without the permission of the instructor

PRIVACY SUGGESTED GUIDE

Please refer to the following privacy guide when recording a lecture, laboratory, or tutorial.

Recording of Lecture Materials

The University of Guelph’s primary mode of course delivery has shifted from face-to-face instruction to remote and online learning due to the ongoing COVID-19 pandemic. As a result, some learning activities (e.g., synchronous lectures or student presentations) may be recorded by faculty, instructors and TAs and posted to CourseLink for grading and dissemination; students may be recorded during these sessions.

The following statements may be added to the course outline and it is recommended these are discussed in any synchronous courses during the first week of classes. 

By enrolling in a course, unless explicitly stated and brought forward to their instructor, it is assumed that students agree to the possibility of being recorded during lecture, seminar or other “live” course activities, whether delivery is in-class or online/remote.

If a student prefers not to be distinguishable during a recording, they may:

  1. turn off their camera
  2. mute their microphone
  3. edit their name (e.g., initials only) upon entry to each session
  4. use the chat function to pose questions. 

Students who express to their instructor that they, or a reference to their name or person, do not wish to be recorded may discuss possible alternatives or accommodations with their instructor.